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By On September 23, 2018

More non-native fish in Singapore waterways

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Login"; document.querySelector('body').innerHTML += noteHTML; document.querySelector('.timeoutmsg-area .close-button').addEventListener('click', function() { document.querySelector('.timeoutmsg-area').classList.add('hidden'); }); } } function timeoutNote() { var oneMin = 60000; var timeDur = 120; var timeoutDuration = timeDur * oneMin; setTimeout(timeoutEvt ,timeoutDuration); } PremiumMore non-native fish in Singapore waterways
File photo of The Sunset Bridge, which connects the two sides of Rochor Canal.
File photo of The Sunset Bridge, which connects the two sides of Rochor Canal.
Published5 hours ago

While yet to gain foothold in forest streams in nature reserves, they're a threat to local wildlife: Experts

More foreign fish are appearing in Singapore's waterways, with experts and conservationists warning that they pose a threat to local wildlife.

A recent viral video showed two boys fishing at Merlion Park, catching a peacock bass - a species native to South America - highlighting a problem which is believed to be widespread.

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Some examples of invasive species in Singapore A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on September 24, 2018, with the headline 'More non-native fish in S'pore waterways'. Print Edition | Subscribe Topics:
  • WILDLIFE
  • ANIMALS
  • NATIONAL PARKS BOARD
  • NUS
  • NATURE SOCIETY (SINGAPORE)

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Source: Google News Singapore | Netizen 24 Singapore

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By On September 23, 2018

A Green Loan Is Behind This Plush Singapore Tower in a Park

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Source: Google News Singapore | Netizen 24 Singapore

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By On September 23, 2018

Singapore May Become First Country to Fully Embrace Cryptocurrencies

News Singapore May Become First Country to Fully Embrace Cryptocurrencies

Paula Baciu | Sep 23, 2018 | 13:00

Singapore took a step closer towards cryptocurrencies as the national financial regulators discussed their openness towards the emerging industry during the Singapore Consensus.

Singapore “Does Not Regulate Technology Itself But [Its] Purpose”

It seems that the Singaporean government has a well-thought-out plan for introducing cryptocurrencies into their economy, according to TechCrunch.

The Singapore Consensus 2018 welcomed thousands of cryptocurrency visionaries, entrepreneurs, and experts to discuss and create new links that might for m the foundation of the future of the industry. An essential element of the meeting was the talk delivered by the representatives of the Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS) with regards to the future of cryptocurrencies in their country. It seems that the Singaporean financial regulators are far ahead many other developed countries concerning their understanding of the industry and plans for the future.

The MAS makes a clear discrimination between different types of cryptocurrencies: utility tokens, payment tokens, and security tokens. Damien Pang, the Head of FinTech Ecosystem and Infrastructure within MAS said that “the MAS takes a close look at the characteristics of the tokens, in the past, at the present, and in the future, instead of just the technology built on.”

No, the MAS will not restrict blockchain or cryptocurrencies, it doesn’t aim to “regulate technology itself but [its] purpose,” according to Pang.

Moreover, the authorities don’t plan to impose regulations on all cryptocurrency products. While payment tokens (which possess economic properties) and security tokens do require certain attention from a legal point of view due to their nature, utility tokens don’t require as much control, Pang pointed out.

Singapore Has Always Been an Asian Jewel

South Asia’s most prominent city-state has long been known for being ahead of the rest of the world in terms of education, entertainment, healthcare, tourism, but most important of all, finance and technologic innovation.

Perhaps it’s their sense of competition, or maybe just the sheer will to provide the latest advancements to their citizens â€" but one thing is clear now: Singapore strives to be one of the first when it comes to cryptocurrency adoption and adaptation.

Cryptocurrency-related projects were very receptive to their welcoming approach and Singap ore consequently became the destination where the first cryptocurrency debit cards will be issued. Besides, the encouraging stance the Monetary Authority of Singapore took towards the industry became slightly obvious a month ago, when the institution announced that it will work along with global institutions in order to introduce tokenized digital currencies.

The message conveyed by the MAS representative last week, therefore, comes as a confirmation that “the most expensive city of the world” (according to The Economist) plans to implement cryptocurrency as a legit financial market.

Do you think Singapore could become an example for other countries? Let us know in a comment below!

Images courtesy of Shutterstock

Source: Google News Singapore | Netizen 24 Singapore

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By On September 23, 2018

Table tennis: Singapore's junior paddlers clinch silver and bronze in team events in Serbia

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A file photo taken on April 9, 2017, shows Singapore's Wong Xin Ru in action during the Asian Table Tennis Championships in Wuxi, China.
A file photo taken on April 9, 2017, shows Singapore's Wong Xin Ru in action during the Asian Table Tennis Championships in Wuxi, China.
Published4 hours ago

SINGAPORE - The Republic's paddlers clinched a silver and bronze in the junior girls' and boys' team events respectively at the Serbian Junior and Cadet Open on Sunday morning (Sept 24, Singapore time).

Singapore's Wong Xin Ru, Goi Rui Xuan and Pearlyn Koh beat an Indian team 3-2 in the semi-finals earlier in the day, but lost 3-1 to the Indian team of Diya Parag Chitale, Sw astika Ghosh and Anusha Kutumbale in the final to settle for silver.

Rui Xuan scored the only point for the Republic in the tie, with her 3-2 (10-12, 11-8, 11-8, 8-11, 11-4) victory over Swastika in the second singles.

The trio of Josh Chua, Koen Pang and Gerald Yu took home a joint bronze, following their 3-0 defeat to China in the junior boys' team semi-finals.

The paddlers finished their campaign with two golds (junior boys' and girls' doubles), a silver (junior girls' team) and four bronzes (junior boys' team, junior boys' doubles, junior boys' and girls' singles).

Topics:
  • TEAM SG
  • TABLE TENNIS

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Source: Google News Singapore | Netizen 24 Singapore

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By On September 23, 2018

Singapore Air Takes Delivery of Jet for World's Longest Flight

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