Netizen 24 SGP: More showers in second half of May, temperatures could go up to 35 deg C

By On May 16, 2018

More showers in second half of May, temperatures could go up to 35 deg C

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Moderate to heavy short thundery showers are forecast between the late morning and afternoon on six to eight days in May.
Published4 hours ago

SINGAPORE - More showers are expected in the second half of May, with wet and warm conditions forecast, the Meteorological Service Singapore (MSS) said on Wednesday (May 16).

Moderate to heavy short thundery showers are forecast between the late morning and afternoon on six to eight days.

In the last week of the month, there could be widespread thundery showers accompanied by occasional gusty winds between the predawn hours and early morning on two or three days, due to the eastward passage of Sumatra squalls.

Climatologically, May is one of the warmest months of the year, and warm conditions are expected to continue into the second half of the month.

Daily maximum temperatures on a few afternoons could reach a high of around 35 deg C when there is less cloud cover coupled with strong solar heating of land areas.

On a few nights, the minimum temperature could drop to around 27 deg C.

On most days, however, daily temperatures are expected to range between 25 deg C and 34 deg C.

The first half of May saw a high daily maximum temperature of 35.2 deg C.

MSS attributed the warm night-time temperatures to light winds blowing from the south-east, which bring warm and humid air from the sea over to land.

Topics:
  • WEATHER
  • METEOROLOGICAL SERVICE SINGAPORE

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